Black Cross/
/What happens if I cross process black and white film?

I used a 120film which is a black and white negative. Do you think you may xpro (With positive and black and white)? What will the effect be like? And if there is a sample image into the net, I'd like to see. Thank you.

You'll end up with a piece of clear plastic. Normally with black and white film, the exposed silver halide get reduced to elemental silver. Then, it eliminates the non-silver halide exposed (fixed) out. This leaves you with transparent film in areas that received no exposure, and film in the dark in areas that received the exposure. Film color basically works the same way, except that the silver halides have something called a dye coupler associated. When you reduce the exposed silver halides, the coupling of dye appears outside, staying in the same place as the silver halide. Then, the unexposed halides are set out, taking their hooves without using dyes with them. The elemental silver left behind, however, masks the effect of colors, so it should be removed using something called bleach. This leaves behind only the dyes in suspension in the emulsion. In black and white film, however, you have nothing but silver and silver halide emulsion after development. So, if you withdraw silver halide, by fixing and silver bleaching, you is not clear, but the jelly on a piece of acetate, in other words, the film clear. This, however, is the best. Black and white processing is normally designed to occur at temperatures in the range of 60-70 degrees Fahrenheit. Color processing usually performed more than 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Color films have some other chemicals, called hardeners, added to the emulsion to maintain intact at such high temperatures. Most black and white films do not have this, as there is no need to. If you try to process black and white film to 100 degrees, at least we will supply networks, where the emulsion separates from the base in places. What probably will happen, however, is the emulsion completely falls. In a processor machine, this means that all the chemicals to get a foul, which requires a total of color and fill. In all likelihood, too, before they discovered the problem, they manage to foul up several rolls of film from others. So, in other words, do not. Not only will you lose your movie, but is also likely to ruin someone else's precious memories. EDIT: Yes, the processing of black and white E6 also will give a clear hint of the film. Processing Black and white is investment in development, followed by bleaching, spray (either chemical or by actual exposure to light), then developing again, and finally fixing. S-6 treatment is similar, except that a second step after the bleach second development. Again, this would remove any remaining silver and leave you with a blank strip of film. In addition, again, E6 targets at 100 degrees temperature, so the emulsion is probably still out.

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